Get ready for No-Mow May

Bugleweed spreads in dense mats help turn a turfgrass lawn into a friendlier place for pollinators.

For about eight weeks, from early March as the snow is melting to the beginning of summer, the annual springtime resurrection of the landscape passes as a blur for those of us who work in the green industry. With more work to do than anyone can expect to fit in a day, spring is equal parts exhilarating and exhausting for gardeners. As we try to keep our heads above water, one of my favorite gardening trends of the last five or 10 years gives some welcome relief.

“No-Mow May” is a relatively simple concept with big implications. Don’t mow your lawn for the month so your landscape can better support early season pollinators. A mowing pause allows lawn “weeds” like henbit (Lamium amplexicaule), white clover (Trifolium repens), or creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea) to flower, providing nectar and pollen sources for bees and other pollinators.