A Home-Based Baker Shouldn’t Have To Choose Between Her Dog and Business

Hula is a good girl. She gets overly excited when guests visit, and sometimes she pokes her nose through the backyard fence and barks. But she follows one important rule: She avoids the room between the kitchen and the driveway.

No dogs are allowed inside. Hula, a 7-year-old Belgian shepherd mix, learned quickly when her human parents renovated the space in November 2022, adding an oven, freezer, cooktop and mixers. “She knows not to go in there,” says Hula’s mom, who uses the pet-free zone for a homemade cookie business and asked to remain anonymous for this piece.

The door mostly stays closed anyway, creating clear boundaries between the main kitchen for family meals and the workspace for “cottage food,” which refers to homemade food for sale. The setup eliminates any sanitation concerns about indoor pets.

“I have really high standards for myself,” says Hula’s mom. “My product is a reflection of me and my integrity.”

Despite the safeguards, Hula’s existence jeopardizes the business. North Carolina, where the family lives, bans pets in homes used for cottage food production. The state Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services makes no exceptions. Even a goldfish or hamster could turn an otherwise legal business into a criminal enterprise.

The pet prohibition puts Hula’s mom in a bind. She could stop selling cookies, move to another state, or lease space in a commercial kitchen, which would mean driving 30 minutes each way to bake on a fixed schedule while paying thousands of dollars in rent—killing flexibility and profit.

The other options are unthinkable. The family could return Hula to the shelter where they rescued her as a puppy. Or they could banish her permanently to the backyard. Hula’s mom refuses.

“Your pet is part of your family,” she said. “I don’t think it’s fair to make me choose between business and family.”

Rather than comply, Hula’s mom took her cottage food operation underground. She pays taxes and obeys other laws, but she skips the mandatory home inspection and certification. Now she must look over her shoulders when she bakes. She cannot advertise, participate in big community events, or do anything else to draw attention to herself.

Too much success could alert government agents, who could show up and bust her. No puppy dog ​​eyes could stop the assault on economic liberty—the right to earn an honest living in a safe and responsible manner.

The zero-tolerance pet policy is just one example of misguided and sometimes unconstitutional cottage food restrictions nationwide. All 50 states and Washington, DC, authorize these home-based businesses. But most jurisdictions also hold them back.

Our public interest law firm, the Institute for Justice, filed lawsuits in Minnesota, Nebraska, and New Jersey to end some of the most stifling cottage food regulations. We sued Wisconsin twice. Yet these are not the only states with problems.

Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, and Washington state cap annual revenue at $25,000, leaving little room for profit after expenses. Hawaii tires online sales and mail-order delivery. Many

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14 Types of Home-Based Businesses to Consider Starting

Home-based businesses put you in control of hours worked and revenue earned. Both full-time and side hustle businesses can be a good way to earn income from your skills and expertise.

After 15 years of juggling a full-time job and a side hustle, I was burned out. It was time to launch my home-based writing and marketing business. It’s the best decision I’ve ever made!

Running my own business from home eliminated a daily commute. Since I hate driving, that’s a major benefit. The freedom to choose clients, set my own hours, and share my office with the dog are sweet perks, too.

The best part about home-based businesses is the opportunity to align your talents, skills and business goals. Whatever your motivation, there are plenty of home-based business ideas to consider.

Launching a business from home has never been easier, thanks to the internet. About half of all US small businesses are considered home-based, and experts predict that, by 2027, more than half the US workforce will be, or will have been at one time, working independently.

But there’s no need to wait. If you’ve ever wondered how to work for yourself, this list of home-based business ideas can get you started this year.

1. Pet care providers and suppliers

Many pet owners treat their animals like family members. They spend generously on products and services to pamper their four-legged friends. Walking, grooming, and pet-sitting services are the most common home-based pet businesses.

There are also more off-the-leash ideas, such as Mugzy’s Barkery, which makes organic pet treats; SleekEZ, which produces grooming tools; and Akita Handmade, which specializes in dog collars, leashes, and bandanas.

An ad for a pet supply and services business.

Selling pet supplies and services is one option for a home-based business. Image source: Author

2. Virtual assistants

Help business leaders and other professionals by doing administrative tasks for them from your home. Virtual assistants take on recurring duties, such as scheduling, business development, social media, and marketing. This can help free up entrepreneurs, managers, and small business owners to focus on larger projects.

Minimal equipment is needed to start, typically just a device for answering emails and completing tasks, along with access to the internet and a phone.

3. Writer

Got a knock for writing compelling stories or catchy phrases? Writers can run a successful home-based business with very little investment. Capitalize on previous professional experience or a hobby to land work.

Working as a writer is flexible enough to fit almost anybody’s style. Here are a few examples.

  • Author
  • Bloggers
  • Copywriter
  • journalist

4. Online store owner

Entrepreneurs often wonder how to start an online business. With the rise of technology and the internet, it has never been easier to launch an online store. E-commerce platforms, such as Etsy, Shopify, Amazon, and others, offer templates for launching an online business in very short orders.

These are three simple ways to start an online store.

  • Buy products in bulk and resell them.
  • Introduce products found during travel or on other outings that are unique to
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EnviroProjects Named SBA’s Maryland Home-Based Business Of The Year

EnviroProjects LLC in Severna Park has been named the 2023 Maryland Home Based Business of the Year, by Stephen D. Umberger, district director of the US Small Business Administration’s Baltimore District Office.

Aaron Keel, principal of EnviroProjects, along with 13 additional award winners from Maryland, will be honored at the 37th annual Maryland Small Business Week Awards Luncheon on June 8 at Martin’s West in Woodlawn, Maryland.

The company assists clients with advanced environmental compliance needs through strategic, cost-effective, accurate and productive solutions. Since 2009, EnviroProjects has specialized in providing natural resource services and regulatory and cultural services while conducting due diligence and contamination assessments. Keel has more than 25 years of experience working with both private development and public infrastructure projects throughout the mid-Atlantic region. He is a member of numerous environmental and civic organizations, most recently serving as chair of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Baltimore District Regionalism Committee, and volunteers with local restoration efforts of the Severn Riverkeeper and Patuxent Riverkeeper organizations.

Each year since 1963, the president has issued a proclamation calling for the celebration of National Small Business Week. This year, the dates are May 1-5, with national events planned virtually and in select cities across the country.

For information on the 2023 Maryland Small Business Week Awards Luncheon or for tickets, visit www.mdsbwawards.org or contact rachel.howard@sba.gov.

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Home business bill SB 1162 shot down by Hobbs | Kingman Daily Miner

PHOENIX — Gov. Katie Hobbs killed legislation Tuesday that proponents said was designed to make it easier for people to operate home-based businesses.

Current law allows such operations as long as they meet certain conditions. And it even allows for temporary commercial signs and offering items for sale.

SB 1162 would have gone a step beyond, declaring that home businesses are “allowed as a use by the right” as long as it doesn’t run afoul of deed restrictions. And it would have eliminated any requirement for licensing that would have allowed city officials to be aware that a business was operating in the area.

“You should be able to operate a home-based business,” said Sen. Steve Kaiser, R-Phoenix, the sponsor of the legislation. He noted that many people started such businesses during COVID.

“We don’t need heavy regulation,” Kaiser said.

Hobbs, however, sided with local officials who were in opposition to effectively removing all their power to regulate.

“While there is no doubt that more can be done to support small businesses in Arizona, this approach is far too broad,” the governor said in his 25th veto of the session. “This bill would create challenges for public safety and code enforcement in neighborhoods.”

That mirrors the comments of Tom Savage, a lobbyist for the League of Arizona Cities and Towns, who was tested against the measure when it was heard by the Senate Commerce Committee. He said the measure would make it more difficult for communities to take care of the needs of adjacent property owners.

“The bill seems to tip the scale in favor of the property rights of those who want to operate a home-based business over the property rights of those who bought their home expecting their neighborhood to be quiet and free from commercial activity,” Savage said . And he said the fact that there are home-based businesses now, under existing local regulations, proves there is no need to further restrict the ability of communities to have some oversight.

But Jenna Bentley, lobbyist for the Goldwater Institute, said the measure is justified.

“Sometimes this is a primary source of income,” she tested. “Sometimes this is a side job they do to help pay for groceries.”

And Bentley said SB 1162 is structured so that it applies only to those operations that have “no impact” on neighborhoods.

Hobbs, in her veto message, was unconvinced.

“I believe that there is a common-sense approach that balances the needs of neighborhoods and small businesses,” she wrote. “This bill fails to strike that balance, and I look forward to working with the Legislature and local leaders to support entrepreneurs and small businesses.”

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Hobbs vetoes limits on local oversight of home-based businesses

PHOENIX — Gov. Katie Hobbs killed legislation that proponents said was designed to make it easier for people to operate home-based businesses.

Current law allows such operations as long as they meet certain conditions and also allows temporary commercial signs and the offering of items for sale.

SB1162 would have gone a step beyond, declaring that home businesses are “allowed as a use by right” as long as they didn’t run afoul of deed restrictions. It would have eliminated any requirement for licensing that would have allowed city officials to be aware a business was operating in the area.

“You should be able to operate a home-based business,” said Sen. Steve Kaiser, R-Phoenix, sponsor of the legislation. He noted that many people started such businesses during COVID. “We don’t need heavy regulation,” Kaiser said.

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Hobbs, however, sided with local officials who opposed, effectively removing all their power to regulate.

“While there is no doubt that more can be done to support small businesses in Arizona, this approach is far too broad,” the Democratic governor said Tuesday in her 25th veto of the legislative session. “This bill would create challenges for public safety and code enforcement in neighborhoods.”

That mirrors the comments of Tom Savage, a lobbyist for the League of Arizona Cities and Towns, who was tested against the measure when it was heard by the Senate Commerce Committee. He said the bill would have made it more difficult for communities to meet the needs of adjacent property owners.

“The bill seems to tip the scale in favor of the property rights of those who want to operate a home-based business over the property rights of those who bought their home expecting their neighborhood to be quiet and free from commercial activity,” Savage said.

He said the fact there are home-based businesses now, under existing local regulations, proves there is no need to further restrict the ability of communities to have some oversight.

But Jenna Bentley, a lobbyist for the Goldwater Institute, which says it advocates against government overreach, said the measure was justified.

“Sometimes this is a primary source of income,” he tested. “Sometimes this is a side job they do to help pay for groceries.”

Bentley said SB1162 was structured to apply only to operations with “no impact” on neighborhoods.

Hobbs, in her veto message, was unconvinced.

“I believe that there is a common-sense approach that balances the needs of neighborhoods and small businesses,” she wrote. “This bill fails to strike that balance, and I look forward to working with the Legislature and local leaders to support entrepreneurs and small businesses.”

Get your morning recap of today’s local news and read the full stories here: tucne.ws/morning



Howard Fischer is a veteran journalist who has been reporting since 1970 and covering state politics and the Legislature since 1982. Follow him on Twitter at @azcapmedia or email azcapmedia@gmail.com.

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